US Army Corps of Engineers
Norfolk District Website

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  • March

    Leading lady: Classic character, modern methods

    Juergens, a logistics management specialist with the Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, was doing what she did best just before boarding a plane from Virginia to South Bridge, Mass.: last-minute packing.
  • Gathright Dam begins routine, controlled flood release

    The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began a controlled flood release at Gathright Dam near Covington, Va., at 8:30 a.m., today.
  • October

    Waterfield Building closed Oct. 29

    Due to local weather and travel conditions, the Waterfield building is closed Monday, Oct. 29. Administrative leave is authorized for employees who work in the Waterfield building. Employees who work at area military installations should follow the instructions of the garrison commander. Employees who work from field or home offices throughout the Commonwealth should work as conditions allow.
  • September

    Gathright Dam ‘test pulse’ to increase Jackson River water flow

    State and federal agencies will use Gathright Dam near Covington, Va. to simulate a storm event on the Jackson River Oct. 3. The test pulse, conducted by the Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, will begin at approximately 6 a.m. and peak at 3,500 cubic feet per second.
  • August

    Beach complete, infrastructure protected

    More than 3 million cubic yards of newly deposited sand is protecting the launch pads and critical infrastructure at NASA’s flight facility at Wallops Island, Va.
  • Benefits of dam removal reach further than expected

    In an area roughly 73 to 93 miles upstream from where Embrey Dam once stood on the Rappahannock River, researchers with the U.S. Geological Survey noticed resurgence in the American eel population in their once-natural habitat, now that they are longer impeded by the 22-foot-high structure.