US Army Corps of Engineers
Norfolk District

Historic Fort Norfolk

FORT NORFOLK, Va. -- A War of 1812 reenactor rests agains the Officers Quarters/Shell House here June 9, 2012. The reenactors were part of OpSail 2012, which marked the bicentennial of the War of 1812 and brought international tall ships and naval vessels to Hampton Roads and other port cities.  (U.S. Army photo/Kerry Solan)
FORT NORFOLK, Va. -- War of 1812 reenactors stand in the shade of a tree here June 9, 2012. The reenactors were part of OpSail 2012, which marked the bicentennial of the War of 1812 and brought international tall ships and naval vessels to Hampton Roads and other port cities.  (U.S. Army photo/Kerry Solan)
FORT NORFOLK, Va. -- War of 1812 reenactors stand outside the navy magazine building here June 9, 2012. The reenactors were part of OpSail 2012, which marked the bicentennial of the War of 1812 and brought international tall ships and naval vessels to Hampton Roads and other port cities.  (U.S. Army photo/Kerry Solan)
FORT NORFOLK, Va. -- War of 1812 reenactors walk the grounds here June 9, 2012. The reenactors were part of OpSail 2012, which marked the bicentennial of the War of 1812 and brought international tall ships and naval vessels to Hampton Roads and other port cities.  (U.S. Army photo/Kerry Solan)
FORT NORFOLK, Va. -- A War of 1812 reenactor stands in the shade of the Officers Quarters/Shell House here June 9, 2012. The reenactors were part of OpSail 2012, which marked the bicentennial of the War of 1812 and brought international tall ships and naval vessels to Hampton Roads and other port cities.  (U.S. Army photo/Kerry Solan)
FORT NORFOLK, Va. -- Fort Norfolk stands open for visitors June 1, 2012. The fort, which is maintained and preserved by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is the last remaining of 19 harbor-front forts authorized in 1794 by President George Washington. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
FORT NORFOLK, Va. -- Contractors re-roof the carpenter's shop and storeroom here Feb. 10, 2012. The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which is headquartered at the fort, is charged with maintaining and preserving Fort Norfolk, one of the last remaining of 19 harbor-front forts authorized in 1794 by President George Washington. (U.S. Army photo/Kerry Solan)
FORT NORFOLK, Va. -- War of 1812 reenactors dress in the fort's guardhouse June 9, 2012. The reenactors were part of OpSail 2012, which marked the bicentennial of the War of 1812 and brought international tall ships and naval vessels to Hampton Roads and other port cities.  (U.S. Army photo/Kerry Solan)
FORT NORFOLK, Va. -- War of 1812 reenactors fire their weapons from the ramparts here June 9, 2012. The reenactors were part of OpSail 2012, which marked the bicentennial of the War of 1812 and brought international tall ships and naval vessels to Hampton Roads and other port cities.  (U.S. Army photo/Kerry Solan)
FORT NORFOLK, Va. -- A War of 1812 reenactor is visible through the fort's stable window June 9, 2012. The reenactors were part of OpSail 2012, which marked the bicentennial of the War of 1812 and brought international tall ships and naval vessels to Hampton Roads and other port cities.  (U.S. Army photo/Kerry Solan)
FORT NORFOLK, Va. -- A War of 1812 reenactor stands at the main gate here June 9, 2012. The reenactors were part of OpSail 2012, which marked the bicentennial of the War of 1812 and brought international tall ships and naval vessels to Hampton Roads and other port cities.  (U.S. Army photo/Kerry Solan)

Fort Norfolk, the last remaining of 19 harbor-front forts authorized in 1794 by President George Washington, is open to the public for free, unguided tours 9 a.m to 4 p.m. Monday through Sunday. Visitors must have a valid federal or state-issued photo ID card to access the fort.

The Norfolk Historical Society conducts guided tours of the fort on Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. from mid-June to the first Sunday in October.

Admission is free, and free parking is available behind the guard house at the entrance to fort.

For more information regarding access to the fort, call 757-201-7015.

For tours and other historical information, call the historical society at 757-640-1720.

History 

In 1794 Congress authorized President George Washington to build a series of fortifications along the "Maritime Frontier" to protect 19 American harbors.

Fort Norfolk, originally built of earthen walls with wooden and some brick supports, is the last remaining of those 18th century defenses.

After the Chesapeake-Leopard affair in June 1807, Fort Norfolk was upgraded in anticipation of a British attack. The brick and masonry walls and buildings completed about 1810 remain at the fort. During the War of 1812, the fort was one of the key defenses to Norfolk's inner harbor and was home to the frigate Constellation. A British attack was repulsed at the nearby Battle of Craney Island.

After the war, Fort Norfolk's strategic value was eclipsed with the construction of Fortress Monroe, and the fort fell into disuse. In 1848, a squatter named Lemuel Fentriss was found living in the officers quarters. Fentriss billed the War department $1,500 for taking care of the government's works, signing with a shaky "X." It is not known if he was ever paid.

The Navy took over the fort in September 1849, establishing a mid-19th century equivalent of today's naval weapons stations. Two barracks were modified and several structures built. The included a massive 55x136-foot powder magazine with walls more than four feet thick, which still stands in the fort today.

Virginia seceded from the Union on April 17, 1861, and rebels seized Fort Norfolk with its powder, shells, and ordnance supplies. Cannon again were mounted, and the fort served as a fiver battery defending the chief naval station of the Confederacy. The fort's magazine supplied the CSS Virginia (formerly the USS Merrimack) for its historic battle with the USS Monitor. The Confederates evacuated Norfolk on May 10, 1862, and the Union Army occupied the fort and used it as a prison for several years.

Fort Norfolk was eventually returned to the Navy, and it became a "much needed" ordnance depot in 1875. Around the turn of the century, the fort was used for storage.

It was occupied by the US Army Corps of Engineers in 1923, and the Corps of Engineers occupies the reservation to this day.          

Text provided by the Norfolk Historical Society website

Visiting the fort

801 Front Street
Norfolk, VA 23510

Hours

Monday-Sunday
9 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

Admission is free, and free parking is available behind the guard house at the entrance.

Visitors must have a valid federal or state-issued photo ID card to access the fort.