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Lt. Gen. Todd T. Semonite (left)  and Sgt. Maj. Bradley J Houston (right) presents Cherie Kunze and Col. Patrick Kinsman with an award for being the seventh best district throughout the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for awarding contracts to Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Businesses.
Small Business Award
Lt. Gen. Todd T. Semonite (left) and Sgt. Maj. Bradley J Houston (right) presents Cherie Kunze, Norfolk District deputy for small business, and Col. Patrick Kinsman, Norfolk District commander, with an award for being the seventh best district throughout the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for awarding contracts to Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Businesses. In fiscal year 2018, the Norfolk District awarded nearly $19 million in contracts to SDVOSB.
Contractors move "Atomic Annie", an M65-series self-propelled artillery piece into plave at the new Ordnance Training and Heritage Center Building August 8, 2018.
Annie Placed
Contractors move "Atomic Annie", an M65-series self-propelled artillery piece into plave at the new Ordnance Training and Heritage Center Building August 8, 2018. The following day crews also moved "Anzio Annie", a German-manufactured K5-series rail gun, which was captured by U.S. forces during World War II, to the new facility. Due to the size and weight of theartillery pieces the building will be built around them. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
Contractors move "Atomic Annie", an M65-series self-propelled artillery piece into plave at the new Ordnance Training and Heritage Center Building August 8, 2018.
Atomic Lift
Contractors move "Atomic Annie", an M65-series self-propelled artillery piece into plave at the new Ordnance Training and Heritage Center Building August 8, 2018. The following day crews also moved "Anzio Annie", a German-manufactured K5-series rail gun, which was captured by U.S. forces during World War II, to the new facility. Due to the size and weight of theartillery pieces the building will be built around them. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
Contractors move "Atomic Annie", an M65-series self-propelled artillery piece into plave at the new Ordnance Training and Heritage Center Building August 8, 2018.
Watching the Atomic Lift
Contractors move "Atomic Annie", an M65-series self-propelled artillery piece into plave at the new Ordnance Training and Heritage Center Building August 8, 2018. The following day crews also moved "Anzio Annie", a German-manufactured K5-series rail gun, which was captured by U.S. forces during World War II, to the new facility. Due to the size and weight of theartillery pieces the building will be built around them. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
The Langley Air Force Base Hospital will be receiving a $52 million addition, which will bring all patient services under one roof.
Langley Hospital Addition
Hampton, Va. -- The Langley Air Force Base Hospital will be receiving a $52 million addition, which will bring all patient services under one roof. Construction on the new 50,544-square-foot addition is expected to start in 2019. (U.S. Army file photo/David Kidd)
Ordnance Corps, Fort Lee, Norfolk District and other Army leaders ceremoniously shovel the first dirt for the construction of the new Ordnance Training Support Facility. The center will house ordnance historical collections and focus on providing training to Ordnance Soldiers. (U.S. Army photo/Chris Hart)
Fort Lee Groundbreaking
Ordnance Corps, Fort Lee, Norfolk District and other Army leaders ceremoniously shovel the first dirt for the construction of the new Ordnance Training Support Facility. The center will house ordnance historical collections and focus on providing training to Ordnance Soldiers. (U.S. Army photo/Chris Hart)
MATHEWS COUNTY, VA – Contractors use a crane to place granite along the bottom of the Piankatank River near Gwynn, Virginia.  The granite is being used to create 25 acres of new sanctuary reef habitat for oysters in the river.  (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
Piankatank Rock Placement
MATHEWS COUNTY, VA – Contractors use a crane to place granite along the bottom of the Piankatank River near Gwynn, Virginia. The granite is being used to create 25 acres of new sanctuary reef habitat for oysters in the river. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
MATHEWS COUNTY, VA – Contractors use a crane to place granite along the bottom of the Piankatank River near Gwynn, Virginia.  The granite is being used to create 25 acres of new sanctuary reef habitat for oysters in the river.  (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
Grabbing Rock
MATHEWS COUNTY, VA – Contractors use a crane to place granite along the bottom of the Piankatank River near Gwynn, Virginia. The granite is being used to create 25 acres of new sanctuary reef habitat for oysters in the river. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
MATHEWS COUNTY, VA – Contractors use a crane to place granite along the bottom of the Piankatank River near Gwynn, Virginia.  The granite is being used to create 25 acres of new sanctuary reef habitat for oysters in the river.  (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
Rock Claw
MATHEWS COUNTY, VA – Contractors use a crane to place granite along the bottom of the Piankatank River near Gwynn, Virginia. The granite is being used to create 25 acres of new sanctuary reef habitat for oysters in the river. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
The beaches at Willoughby Spit, East Ocean View and Ocean View have been widened to provide additional protection to city of Norfolk neighborhoods from wave damage during coastal storms. Crews finished up pumping sand onto the beach from the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay on May 19, 2017. The beaches are no 60 feet wide and slope up to 5 feet above mean low water.
Widened Beach
The beaches at Willoughby Spit, East Ocean View and Ocean View have been widened to provide additional protection to city of Norfolk neighborhoods from wave damage during coastal storms. Crews finished up pumping sand onto the beach from the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay on May 19, 2017. The beaches are no 60 feet wide and slope up to 5 feet above mean low water.
NORFOLK, Va. -- Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ contractors from Great Lakes Dredging and Dock Company use bulldozers to push sand dredged from the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay into place along Norfolk, Virginia’s Ocean View Beach. The sand is part of a $34.5 million project to reduce storm damage risk to infrastructure along a 7.3 mile stretch of waterfront, which is susceptible to damage during costal storms. Once complete, the beach will be 60 feet wide and slope up to 5 feet above mean low water. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
Bulldozer at the Ready
NORFOLK, Va. -- Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ contractors from Great Lakes Dredging and Dock Company use bulldozers to push sand dredged from the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay into place along Norfolk, Virginia’s Ocean View Beach. The sand is part of a $34.5 million project to reduce storm damage risk to infrastructure along a 7.3 mile stretch of waterfront, which is susceptible to damage during costal storms. Once complete, the beach will be 60 feet wide and slope up to 5 feet above mean low water. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
NORFOLK, Va. -- Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ contractors from Great Lakes Dredging and Dock Company pump sand dredged from the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay up to Norfolk, Virginia’s Ocean View Beach. The sand is part of a $34.5 million project to reduce storm damage risk to infrastructure along a 7.3 mile stretch of waterfront, which is susceptible to damage during costal storms. Once complete, the beach will be 60 feet wide and slope up to 5 feet above mean low water. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
Beach Building
NORFOLK, Va. -- Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ contractors from Great Lakes Dredging and Dock Company pump sand dredged from the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay up to Norfolk, Virginia’s Ocean View Beach. The sand is part of a $34.5 million project to reduce storm damage risk to infrastructure along a 7.3 mile stretch of waterfront, which is susceptible to damage during costal storms. Once complete, the beach will be 60 feet wide and slope up to 5 feet above mean low water. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
NORFOLK, Va. -- Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ contractors from Great Lakes Dredging and Dock Company pump sand dredged from the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay up to Norfolk, Virginia’s Ocean View Beach. The sand is part of a $34.5 million project to reduce storm damage risk to infrastructure along a 7.3 mile stretch of waterfront, which is susceptible to damage during costal storms. Once complete, the beach will be 60 feet wide and slope up to 5 feet above mean low water. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
Pumping Sand
NORFOLK, Va. -- Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ contractors from Great Lakes Dredging and Dock Company pump sand dredged from the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay up to Norfolk, Virginia’s Ocean View Beach. The sand is part of a $34.5 million project to reduce storm damage risk to infrastructure along a 7.3 mile stretch of waterfront, which is susceptible to damage during costal storms. Once complete, the beach will be 60 feet wide and slope up to 5 feet above mean low water. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
NORFOLK, Va. -- Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ contractors from Great Lakes Dredging and Dock Company pump sand dredged from the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay up to Norfolk, Virginia’s Ocean View Beach. The sand is part of a $34.5 million project to reduce storm damage risk to infrastructure along a 7.3 mile stretch of waterfront, which is susceptible to damage during costal storms. Once complete, the beach will be 60 feet wide and slope up to 5 feet above mean low water. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
Moving Fresh Sand
NORFOLK, Va. -- Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ contractors from Great Lakes Dredging and Dock Company pump sand dredged from the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay up to Norfolk, Virginia’s Ocean View Beach. The sand is part of a $34.5 million project to reduce storm damage risk to infrastructure along a 7.3 mile stretch of waterfront, which is susceptible to damage during costal storms. Once complete, the beach will be 60 feet wide and slope up to 5 feet above mean low water. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
Heavy equipment is staged along the beach in Norfolk, Virginia’s East Ocean View neighborhood. Contractors will use the equipment to move dredged up sand on the beach to create a 60 foot wide beach berm that slopes to 5 feet above mean low water. Engineers’ designed the beach to absorb the wave energy, protecting critical infrastructure during coastal storms. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
Equipment Staging
Heavy equipment is staged along the beach in Norfolk, Virginia’s East Ocean View neighborhood. Contractors will use the equipment to move dredged up sand on the beach to create a 60 foot wide beach berm that slopes to 5 feet above mean low water. Engineers’ designed the beach to absorb the wave energy, protecting critical infrastructure during coastal storms. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)

Civil Works

Projects within our civil works mission provides water resources support to the Commonwealth of Virginia, its towns, counties, and cities, as well as non-governmental organizations with environmental restoration, flood risk management, and navigation products and services. The Norfolk District’s civil works boundaries cover over 21,000 square miles and include the Rappahannock, York, James and Chowan river basins, as well as the Virginia portion of the Chesapeake Bay coastal basin.

Civil Works Home Page

Military Construction

The Norfolk District supports Army and Air Force installations in the Commonwealth of Virginia outside of the Military District of Washington with engineering, construction and project management services. The district handles major design and construction efforts for nine installations, Arlington National Cemetery, Defense Supply Center Richmond, Fort A.P. Hill, Fort Lee, Fort Pickett, the National Ground Intelligence Center, Radford Ammunition Plant and Joint Base Langley-Eustis.

Military Construction Projects

Environmental

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers manages one of the largest federal environmental missions: restoring degraded ecosystems; constructing sustainable facilities; regulating waterways; managing natural resources; and, cleaning up contaminated sites from past military activities.

Environmental Projects

Interagency and International Support

The Norfolk District’s Interagency and International Services program provides planning, engineering design and construction management, environmental services, and technical services related to water, natural resources, buildings and infrastructure

Interagency and International Support

Project Vault

Learn more about some of the older projects the district has completed in our Project Vault.

Project Vault