US Army Corps of Engineers
Norfolk District Website

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  • February

    Historic Fort Norfolk to close for building repairs Feb. 24

    Fort Norfolk will close to visitors from Feb. 24 to June 6 as contractors replace the roof on a circa 1855 magazine building.
  • Great Bridge Lock reopens to vessel traffic

    The Great Bridge Lock on the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal reopened this afternoon after a two-day closure to vessel traffic to replace lock gates.
  • Gathright Dam to conduct a routine, controlled flood release

    The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will begin a controlled flood release at Gathright Dam near Covington, Va., at 9:00 a.m., today.
  • N.J. company contracted to rebuild NASA dunes and berms post Sandy

    The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers awarded a New Jersey-based company a $10.5 million contract to replace sand along NASA’s Wallops Island launch facilities near Chincoteague Va.
  • January

    Corps completes Lynnhaven Inlet dredging; shoaling removed, community beaches renourished

    The Lynnhaven Inlet Federal Navigation Channel is fully navigable, after a $2 million maintenance dredging project removed critical shoaling conditions exacerbated by Hurricane Sandy in 2012.
  • Norfolk District shines for Elizabeth River restoration

    VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. – A 623-square-foot sanctuary oyster reef in the Elizabeth River captured recognition for the Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ environmental work yesterday.
  • November

    Great Bridge Lock down; Corps divers on the scene

    The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers closed the Great Bridge Lock in Chesapeake, Va., at approximately 7:30 a.m., today to repair inoperative valve.
  • October

    Continuing resolution reopens district's regulatory office

    Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers regulatory employees returned to work today after the enactment of a continuing resolution to fund the government until January 15. The employees, environmental scientists and administrative support staff assigned to the Norfolk District’s Regulatory Branch, will restart regulatory operations immediately, said Kimberly Prisco-Baggett, acting chief of the branch.
  • Norfolk District snags installation support award

    U.S. Army Installation Management Command awarded the Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers with the 2012 Director of Public Works Installation Support Program of the Year. The nomination noted Norfolk District’s “team approach in delighting the ultimate customer – the soldier.”
  • District furloughs employees as USACE suspends regulatory operations nationwide

    NORFOLK -- The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, will issue furlough notices to 48
  • September

    Corps awards contract to Illinois small business for NASA project

    The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, awarded a contract Aug. 28 to a Belleville, Ill., small business, BCI Construction USA, Inc., for potable water system repairs at NASA's Langley Research Center, located in Hampton, Va.
  • August

    Gathright Dam to perform 'pulse release'

    The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, will conduct a pulse release at Gathright Dam, near Covington, Va., on Tuesday, Sept. 3, beginning at approximately 6 a.m.
  • Gathright Dam ‘pulse release’ to increase Jackson River water flow

    The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, will conduct a pulse release at Gathright Dam, near Covington, Va., on Tuesday, Aug. 13, beginning at approximately 6 a.m.
  • June

    2-plus million cubic yards added to Sandbridge beachfront; Big Beach completion now under way

    VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. -- A five-mile hurricane protection and beach renourishment project in Sandbridge is complete.
  • Officials cancel Gathright Dam pulse release

    Federal and commonwealth officials have canceled Gathright Dam’s pulse release scheduled for Tuesday. The Norfolk District, in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, determined that June’s higher-than-average flows in the Jackson River eliminated the need for the first planned pulse release.
  • Corps assists park service in protecting parkway from river

    As the York River encroaches on the Colonial Parkway, engineers have found that rocks are part of the answer to fixing critically damaged and eroded shoreline. That is why contractors, working for the Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, are using heavy equipment to place large boulders along the edge of the York River to stabilize and strengthen a section of the shoreline.
  • Corps begins Rudee Inlet dredging

    The Army Corps of Engineers will begin dredging the Rudee Inlet Federal Navigation Project here Monday. The Corps’ dredge Merritt, based out of Wilmington, N.C., will dredge for four days to remove shoaling in the channel. Engineers expect to dredge about 20,000 cubic yards of material, which will be placed directly north of the entrance channel and inlet jetties. The $78,000 project is 72 percent federally funded. Virginia Beach will fund the remaining 28 percent.
  • May

    Corps of Engineers and commonwealth of Virginia announce Gathright Dam pulse release dates

    COVINGTON, Va. – The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will deviate from Gathright Dam’s existing water control plan in order to conduct six pulse releases from June through October 2013.
  • April

    Corps begins $144K Bennett’s Creek dredging

    SUFFOLK, Va. -- The Army Corps of Engineers’ dredge Currituck arrived here Saturday to dredge the federal navigation channel in Bennett’s Creek. Significant shoaling, caused by natural transport and deposit of sediment, made dredging necessary. The natural shoaling was exacerbated by Hurricane Sandy.
  • March

    For eroding island, engineers' efforts start with models

    Researchers are using wind, wave, turbidity data and more to understand the conditions in the Tangier Federal Navigation Channel and harbor. The resulting computer model will help determine what type and size of jetty will protect the waterway and harbor from wave attack, ultimately saving the local watermen tens of thousands of dollars in repair costs during storms.