US Army Corps of Engineers
Norfolk District

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  • May

    “Goo Must Go” - Back in Business on the Elizabeth

    A program to be signed by the Corps of Engineers on May 24 will be the first of its kind in the country and will once again allow impacts to healthy river bottom on the Elizabeth River to go forward while developers offset the impacts by cleaning up some of the contaminated “goo” elsewhere on the river.
  • October

    Final Gathright Dam pulse release of 2015 scheduled for Wednesday

    Operators at Gathright Dam near Covington, Virginia will conduct the final pulse release of the year Wednesday. The pulse, conducted by the Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, will begin at approximately 6 a.m. and end at 1:30 p.m. and will increase levels 3 to 4.5 feet in the Jackson River.
  • June

    Corps, volunteers collect more than 2,000 pounds of shoreline debris

    PORTSMOUTH, Virginia – Sunglasses. Check! Bug spray. Check! Bottled water. Check! Trash bags. Check!
  • March

    Permit proffered for Henry County's Commonwealth Crossing Business Center

    Regulators with the Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers here forwarded an initial proffered permit to Henry County Industrial Development Authority officials today, crossing an important milestone in the federal permitting process for the proposed Commonwealth Crossing Business Center in Henry County, Va.
  • February

    A river runs free 10 years later

    On the morning of February 23, 2004 the excitement around Fredericksburg, Va., was palpable – school children, dignitaries, and media from around the world converged along the Rappahannock River to watch an obsolete dam blow open.
  • January

    Corps completes Lynnhaven Inlet dredging; shoaling removed, community beaches renourished

    The Lynnhaven Inlet Federal Navigation Channel is fully navigable, after a $2 million maintenance dredging project removed critical shoaling conditions exacerbated by Hurricane Sandy in 2012.
  • October

    District furloughs employees as USACE suspends regulatory operations nationwide

    NORFOLK -- The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, will issue furlough notices to 48
  • Going big: district tackles oysters, Lynnhaven

    Contractors for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are moving mountains of fossil oyster shell from Craney Island in Portsmouth, Va., to build 16 acres of sanctuary reefs in Elizabeth River and some of its tributaries, while the work to bring environmental restoration on the Lynnhaven River is ongoing.
  • August

    Gathright Dam to perform 'pulse release'

    The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, will conduct a pulse release at Gathright Dam, near Covington, Va., on Tuesday, Sept. 3, beginning at approximately 6 a.m.
  • Gathright Dam ‘pulse release’ to increase Jackson River water flow

    The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, will conduct a pulse release at Gathright Dam, near Covington, Va., on Tuesday, Aug. 13, beginning at approximately 6 a.m.
  • Big Beach renourishment complete

    Contractors smoothed out the last of the sand on the Virginia Beach, Va., beachfront Aug. 1, completing a beach renourishment cycle that widened the buffer between punishing storm surge and the city’s homes, businesses and tourist attractions.
  • July

    Craney Island’s oyster mitigation project set for summer launch

    Oysters are expanding their real estate in the Elizabeth River and Hoffler Creek this summer, thanks to a USACE, VPA partnership to construct 16 acres of oyster reef, part of the Craney Island Eastward Expansion project.
  • June

    2-plus million cubic yards added to Sandbridge beachfront; Big Beach completion now under way

    VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. -- A five-mile hurricane protection and beach renourishment project in Sandbridge is complete.
  • October

    Regulators focused on mission as Clean Water Act turns 40

    The Clean Water Act turns 40 today and, though opponents and supporters still debate the scope and effectiveness of the landmark legislation, employees of the regulatory branch here have a clear understanding of their mission. “It’s about being consistent and operating within the scope of our authorities,” said Col. Paul Olsen, Norfolk District commander. “It’s about balancing the nation’s passion to build with the needs of the environment.”
  • August

    Benefits of dam removal reach further than expected

    In an area roughly 73 to 93 miles upstream from where Embrey Dam once stood on the Rappahannock River, researchers with the U.S. Geological Survey noticed resurgence in the American eel population in their once-natural habitat, now that they are longer impeded by the 22-foot-high structure.