US Army Corps of Engineers
Norfolk District

Millennium Project work begins at Arlington National Cemetery

Norfolk District Public Affairs
Published Feb. 21, 2014
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Construction crews move dirt and prepare the ground at the Arlington National Cemetery Millennium Expansion Project, Feb. 19, 2014. The 27-acre project will add nearly 30,000 burial and niche spaces with a mix of above-ground columbariums and in-ground burials. The project also involves restoring an impaired stream that runs through the area. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)

ARLINGTON, Va. -- Construction crews move dirt and prepare the ground at the Arlington National Cemetery Millennium Expansion Project, Feb. 19, 2014. The 27-acre project will add nearly 30,000 burial and niche spaces with a mix of above-ground columbariums and in-ground burials. The project also involves restoring an impaired stream that runs through the area. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)

ARLINGTON, Va. -- Juan Benavides, a sub-contractor with Hercules Fencing, places privacy slats into fencing that separates the Millennium Project from the rest of Arlington National Cemetery, Feb. 19, 2014. Contractors are using the fencing to keep the general public out of the active construction area for the 27-acre project, which will add nearly 30,000 burial and niche spaces with a mix of above-ground columbariums and in-ground burials. The project also involves restoring an impaired stream that runs through the area. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)

ARLINGTON, Va. -- Juan Benavides, a sub-contractor with Hercules Fencing, places privacy slats into fencing that separates the Millennium Project from the rest of Arlington National Cemetery, Feb. 19, 2014. Contractors are using the fencing to keep the general public out of the active construction area for the 27-acre project, which will add nearly 30,000 burial and niche spaces with a mix of above-ground columbariums and in-ground burials. The project also involves restoring an impaired stream that runs through the area. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)

ARLINGTON, Va. -- Juan Benavides, a sub-contractor with Hercules Fencing, places privacy slats into fencing that separates the Millennium Project from the rest of Arlington National Cemetery Feb. 19, 2014. Contractors are using the fencing to keep the general public out of the active construction area for the 27-acre project, which will add nearly 30,000 burial and niche spaces with a mix of above-ground columbariums and in-ground burials. The project also involves restoring an impaired stream that runs through the area. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)

ARLINGTON, Va. -- Juan Benavides, a sub-contractor with Hercules Fencing, places privacy slats into fencing that separates the Millennium Project from the rest of Arlington National Cemetery Feb. 19, 2014. Contractors are using the fencing to keep the general public out of the active construction area for the 27-acre project, which will add nearly 30,000 burial and niche spaces with a mix of above-ground columbariums and in-ground burials. The project also involves restoring an impaired stream that runs through the area. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)

Crews working for the Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are preparing land designated for the growth of Arlington National Cemetery.

The 27-acre Millennium Project adds nearly 30,000 burial and niche spaces to the cemetery, which is running out of room to honor America’s military veterans. 

“After several years of planning, studying, and designing this project, we are honored to say that the Millennium expansion project of Arlington National Cemetery is underway,” said Greg Hegge, Norfolk District project manager.

According to officials, the project is needed for the cemetery to continue to inter the nation’s veterans in this historic location. 

“Families come from all over the country to bury their loved ones at Arlington National Cemetery,” said Patrick K. Hallinan, executive director, Army National Military Cemeteries. “The Army remains committed to maintaining Arlington as an active military cemetery as long as possible to continue to honor and serve our nation’s military heroes.”

The Millennium Project includes stream restoration, columbarium niche space, two committal service shelters, as well as in-ground burial space.

“Many of the in ground burial spaces will be constructed using a system of pre-placed concrete crypts, which are buried during initial construction rather than at the time of a burial,” Hegge said. “This results in a much higher level of quality and consistency, while reducing the effort necessary in the future.”

During the construction process, visitors will notice fencing surrounding the expansion project and an increased level of truck traffic near the northern end of the cemetery. Crews are working with cemetery staff to not interrupt burial services.

Hegge expects the construction process to take approximately three years with the first interments  occurring in the summer of 2019, following the necessary time to establish suitable landscaping.

The Millennium Project is an $84 million expansion project located along the northern edge of Arlington National Cemetery bordering Joint Base Myers-Henderson Hall.