US Army Corps of Engineers
Norfolk District Website

Survey crews to start work on Tangier Jetty

Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Public Affairs Office
Published Dec. 13, 2012
TANGIER ISLAND, Va. -- From left, Congressman Scott Rigell, Gov. Bob McDonnell and Tangier's mayor, James "Ooker" Eskridge, look on as Col. Paul Olsen, Norfolk District commander, signs a proclamation Nov. 20, 2012. The governor and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recently announced plans to build a long-awaited jetty to protect the island's endangered harbor. With the Corps' agreement several weeks ago to commit federal funds, a cost-sharing agreement with the Commonwealth was signed and the project approved for study, design and construction. (U.S. Army photo/Kerry Solan)

TANGIER ISLAND, Va. -- From left, Congressman Scott Rigell, Gov. Bob McDonnell and Tangier's mayor, James "Ooker" Eskridge, look on as Col. Paul Olsen, Norfolk District commander, signs a proclamation Nov. 20, 2012. The governor and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recently announced plans to build a long-awaited jetty to protect the island's endangered harbor. With the Corps' agreement several weeks ago to commit federal funds, a cost-sharing agreement with the Commonwealth was signed and the project approved for study, design and construction. (U.S. Army photo/Kerry Solan)

NORFOLK – Physical work on the feasibility phase of the Tangier Jetty program is set to begin this week, weather dependant.

A Norfolk District survey crew will operate in the water where the jetty is to be built at the federal navigation channel entranceway on the western side of the island.

“We just received the funds in house and so we are able to mobilize and begin the boots on the ground physical work on this project,” said Tom Lochen, Norfolk District project manager.

The crew is expected to be on site for a few hours taking measurements every 50 feet with single-beam  SONAR equipment.

Watercraft in the area are asked to maintain a safe distance and speed near the location of the crew so they can safely obtain accurate readings.

Once the data is collected, it will be processed, verified and submitted to the Corps’ Engineer Research and Development Center for inclusion in the computer modeling process, which will determine how the jetty should be designed and built.  

The modeling process is expected to start in January 2013 and will take about six months to complete.