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Chesapeake Bay Oyster Recovery Project Piankatank River, Virginia

Granite rock, which is brought in by barge, is methodically placed in the Piankatank River near Gwynn’s Island in Mathews County Virginia. The rock is the basis for the newest, 25-acre oyster reef in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is overseeing the more than $2 million sanctuary reef project in partnership with the Virginia Marine Resources Commission and the Nature Conservancy.   (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
A look at reef building
Granite rock, which is brought in by barge, is methodically placed in the Piankatank River near Gwynn’s Island in Mathews County Virginia. The rock is the basis for the newest, 25-acre oyster reef in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is overseeing the more than $2 million sanctuary reef project in partnership with the Virginia Marine Resources Commission and the Nature Conservancy. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
Granite rock, which is brought in by barge, is methodically placed in the Piankatank River near Gwynn’s Island in Mathews County Virginia. The rock is the basis for the newest, 25-acre oyster reef in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is overseeing the more than $2 million sanctuary reef project in partnership with the Virginia Marine Resources Commission and the Nature Conservancy.   (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
A look at reef building
Granite rock, which is brought in by barge, is methodically placed in the Piankatank River near Gwynn’s Island in Mathews County Virginia. The rock is the basis for the newest, 25-acre oyster reef in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is overseeing the more than $2 million sanctuary reef project in partnership with the Virginia Marine Resources Commission and the Nature Conservancy. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
MATHEWS COUNTY, VA – Contractors use a crane to place granite along the bottom of the Piankatank River near Gwynn, Virginia.  The granite is being used to create 25 acres of new sanctuary reef habitat for oysters in the river.  (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
Piankatank Rock Placement
MATHEWS COUNTY, VA – Contractors use a crane to place granite along the bottom of the Piankatank River near Gwynn, Virginia. The granite is being used to create 25 acres of new sanctuary reef habitat for oysters in the river. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
Granite rock, which is brought in by barge, is methodically placed in the Piankatank River near Gwynn’s Island in Mathews County Virginia. The rock is the basis for the newest, 25-acre oyster reef in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is overseeing the more than $2 million sanctuary reef project in partnership with the Virginia Marine Resources Commission and the Nature Conservancy.   (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
A look at reef building
Granite rock, which is brought in by barge, is methodically placed in the Piankatank River near Gwynn’s Island in Mathews County Virginia. The rock is the basis for the newest, 25-acre oyster reef in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is overseeing the more than $2 million sanctuary reef project in partnership with the Virginia Marine Resources Commission and the Nature Conservancy. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
MATHEWS COUNTY, VA – Contractors use a crane to place granite along the bottom of the Piankatank River near Gwynn, Virginia.  The granite is being used to create 25 acres of new sanctuary reef habitat for oysters in the river.  (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
Grabbing Rock
MATHEWS COUNTY, VA – Contractors use a crane to place granite along the bottom of the Piankatank River near Gwynn, Virginia. The granite is being used to create 25 acres of new sanctuary reef habitat for oysters in the river. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
MATHEWS COUNTY, VA – Contractors use a crane to place granite along the bottom of the Piankatank River near Gwynn, Virginia.  The granite is being used to create 25 acres of new sanctuary reef habitat for oysters in the river.  (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)
Rock Claw
MATHEWS COUNTY, VA – Contractors use a crane to place granite along the bottom of the Piankatank River near Gwynn, Virginia. The granite is being used to create 25 acres of new sanctuary reef habitat for oysters in the river. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick Bloodgood)

Project Scope

The Piankatank River Oyster Recovery Project phase one consists of constructing more than 25 acres of artificial reef habitats using granite rock as the base material. The reef will be built using either an excavator or clam-shell bucket to minimize disturbance to the ecosystem. This is the first of multiple phases for the project, and upon completion of all phases the project will include 190 acres of new oyster reef habitat as well as rehabilitation of 30 acres of existing habitat. 

Authorization

704B of the Water Resources Development Act of 1986

Background

The Piankatank River Oyster Recovery Project is one of a number of recovery projects throughout the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland and Virginia. The overall goal of the Chesapeake Bay Native Oyster Recovery Project is the restoration of a self-sustaining oyster population, which enhances oyster recruitment locally, and improves the environmental quality of the Chesapeake Bay  

Construction Cost

Phase 1 = $2,080,770

Split between cost share partners, 75% federal and 25% non-federal. 

Schedule 

Contract award March 2017
Construction start May 2017
Completion anticipated August 2017

 

Project Location

Project Map

Project Contact

803 Front Street
Norfolk, VA 23508
757-201-7606

Project Partners

 The Nature Conservancy  Virginia Marine Resources Commission